Mark 6:30-56

Feeding 5000+

The only miracle during the ministry of Christ that all four gospel writers record. Mark wants us to know about the difference between the 5000 & 4000 group in Mk. 8. The 5000+ group was predominantly a Jewish crowd, because both accounts feeding 5000 use the word “kophinos” for baskets, Mt. 14:20 & Mk. 6:43. The second event of 4000 men, recorded in Mt. 15 & Mk. 8 is predominantly a Gentile crowd, because both accounts feeding 4000 use the word “spuris” for baskets, Mt. 15:37 & Mk. 8:8. Which may explain why the disciples don’t seem to expect Jesus to feed them, even after they saw him feed the Jewish crowd beforehand. Notice in the first event the disciples come to Jesus asking about food for the crowd, but in the second event, it is the other way around. Jesus asks the disciples about feeding the crowd. Notice, regardless of what kind of people are in the crowds, in each case, Jesus performs the miracle, but the disciples are commanded to distribute the miracle. Setting people in segregated groups of 50 – 100 (Luke 9:14, Mark 6:39-40) Is there a lesson for the church to learn from this in the distribution of God’s word? His word is certainly produced miraculously and abundantly, but how do we distribute it? Paul taught in 2nd Corinthians 9:8-12, “Besides, God is able to make every blessing of yours overflow for you, so that in every situation you will always have all you need for any good work. As it is written, “He scatters everywhere and gives to the poor; his righteousness lasts forever.” Now he who supplies seed to the farmer and bread to eat will also supply you with seed and multiply it and enlarge the harvest that results from your righteousness. In every way you will become even more generous, and this will cause others to give thanks to God because of us, because this ministry you render is not only fully supplying the needs of the saints, it is also overflowing with more and more prayers of thanksgiving to God. Herein may be the point of these miracles in the Bible, that is: God’s generosity towards us through His word, is what promotes praise & thanksgiving so that others in the world will get fed. More people will get fed, than you can dream of, if you will feed them with whatever amount of God’s word you have to give them!

Walking on Water

Where were the eyes of Peter’s heart focused? This was more important than where his feet were or what they were doing, Ephesians 1:17-18. The point of this miracle is to teach us how hard it is to walk spiritually with God, when storms hit us. The New Testament is used by God to teach us to keep walking and when the storms of life get fierce, we must STAND, Ephesians 6:10-18. But for most of our life as a Christian, we are to walk in the newness of life, Romans 6:4, remembering that babies in Christ can’t walk, they must feed & grow! Walk by the rule that only a new creation counts for anything, Galatians 6:15-16. Walk in the good works God prepared for you, Ephesians 2:10. Walk in His love & light, Ephesians 5:2-8. Walk in wisdom, Colossians 4:5. Walk with him as a divine guest in the Spirit, Galatians 5:16-25. This is the miracle, which Jesus uses to emphasize the necessity of “walking”.

Healing the Sick

This fact shows there was a general consensus in the practice of Jews clinging to the commandment in Numbers 15:37-41 referencing the borders of garments having blue ribbons or fringes to remember the holy commandments of God in contrast to their own sinful desires of their hearts. Jesus was constantly searching and accomplishing His Father’s will. This was indicative of the holiness of God in a person’s life. Many theologians believe that this may be the only biblical reference to the kind of clothes Jesus wore, except for the mention of his seamless tunic – “chiton”, the soldiers at the cross valued, John 19:23-24.

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